Michele vs Alyssa

Posted On Feb 10 2020 by

first_imgTaiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Filipinos wiped out Phinma-PSC int’l tennis Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Gumabao, team captain of Open and Reinforced Conferences V-League champion Pocari, and three-time Most Valuable Player Valdez will lead the fund-raising event for the victims of last month’s Typhoon “Lawin” in North Luzon. The match starts 5:15 p.m. Marc ReyesFEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agent Michele Gumabao and Alyssa Valdez will pit skills anew but this time for charity in the Shakey’s All-Star Games at Philsports Arena Sunday.ADVERTISEMENT Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 EDITORS’ PICK We are young Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise MOST READ PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next View commentslast_img read more


Natural gas project that promised economic boom leaves PNG in ‘worse state’: report

Posted On Feb 10 2020 by

first_imgCorporate Social Responsibility, Development, Economics, Environment, Fossil Fuels, Indigenous Peoples, Infrastructure, Land Rights, Natural Gas Proponents of PNG LNP, an ExxonMobil-led natural gas project in Papua New Guinea, predicted it would bring massive economic benefits to landowners and to the country as a whole.According to two recent reports by the Jubilee Australia Research Centre, PNG’s economy is worse off than it would have been without the project.Jubilee Australia also links the PNG LNG project to an upswing of violence in the areas around the plant. In 2008, when a consortium led by ExxonMobil was drumming up support for a $19 billion natural gas extraction and processing project in Papua New Guinea, proponents of the development predicted it would underpin the country’s economy for decades.Production began in 2014, and now reaches approximately 7.9 million tonnes of liquefied natural gas per year. However, according to two recent reports by advocacy group Jubilee Australia Research Centre, the PNG LNG project has not only exacerbated conflict and inequality in the Papua New Guinea highlands, it has also failed to produce the promised benefits. According to Jubilee Australia’s analysis, PNG’s economy would be better off if the gas had been left in the ground.Predicted economic impacts of the PNG LNG project compared to actual impacts (based on Jubilee Australia’s analysis of underlying economic trends). While exports have exceeded expectations, GDP growth has been slower than forecast and income, employment and government spending have dropped. Image courtesy of Jubilee Australia.Big promisesWhen pitching the project, developers made big promises about the economic and social benefits the megaproject would bring to the country.One influential 2008 study, an economic impact analysis commissioned by ExxonMobil and authored by Australian consultants ACIL-Tasman (now ACIL-Allen), predicted the project would bring a tremendous windfall not only to shareholders, but also to the people of PNG. It forecast the overall size of the country’s economy would nearly double, household incomes would rise by 84 percent, and employment increase by 42 percent.Backers of the project argued that these anticipated benefits would more than compensate for any adverse environmental or social impacts a giant natural gas facility might bring in its wake.Instead, says Jubilee Australia, PNG is today worse off than it would have been if the country’s economy had simply continued developing at the same pace as prior to the launch of the project.“Currently, on almost all economic indicators, the people of PNG would have been better off had the project not happened at all,” report co-author Paul Flanagen, who has served as a senior adviser to the Australian government and the PNG treasury, said in a press statement.Jubilee Australia’s analysis found that instead of the 97 percent increase anticipated by ACIL-Tasman, PNG’s economy in 2016 was just 10 percent larger than its pre-LNG growth path would have predicted — most of that concentrated in the largely foreign-owned extractive sector. Instead of rising by 84 percent, household incomes fell by 6 percent in the same period, while employment fell by 27 percent.Even with the moderate increase in the size of the economy, government expenditure to support better education, health, law and order, and infrastructure fell below the baseline by 32 percent, rather than the 85 percent increase anticipated by the ACIL-Tasman report.Significantly, these decreases came even though production at the facility has exceeded expectations — an increase Jubilee Australia contends was more than sufficient to compensate for the impacts of falling gas prices.The Tari Gap in Hela Province in the Papua New Guinea Highlands. Photographed in 2003 before the arrival of the PNG LNG project. Image by Ron Knight via Flickr, CC-BY.Falling shortThe authors point to several factors.  First, they cite “serious flaws” in the economic impact analysis, describing the forecasts as “extraordinarily over-optimistic.”Government revenue has also fallen short of expectations due to a combination of generous tax concessions offered to the project, and what the report describes as “aggressive tax avoidance” by the companies involved.“Exxon and Oil Search” — the second-largest stakeholder in the joint venture — “should be paying half a billion [Australian] dollars [$377 million] to the PNG government every year, since the gas started to flow in 2014,” Jubilee Australia executive director Luke Fletcher said in a press statement. “Instead, they are paying a fraction of this amount, partly because of their use of tax havens in the Netherlands and the Bahamas.”Drawing on an analysis by the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative, the authors note that the PNG government received more money from personal income taxes paid by ExxonMobil employees than it did from corporate tax from the company.Further, the report points to “poor policy decisions made by the PNG government in response to the gas boom.” Exuberant spending in the early years of the project led to debt and deficit when the anticipated revenue failed to flow into government coffers.Landowners, too, have not received the royalties they expected, a problem Jubilee Australia attributes largely to a failure to vet and identify beneficiaries before production began. Clan boundaries were mapped, but the individuals entitled to payments were not specified as part of the original agreement. This, the reports argues, has been an ongoing source of conflict and uncertainty and has fed into violent unrest in the territories around the project.“During the construction phase of the project landowners had jobs, families had money, and conflict between clans was minimal,” report co-author and anthropologist Michael Main said in a press statement. “When construction ended and people lost their jobs, money stopped flowing, frustrations built up and violent conflict escalated to catastrophic levels.”A Huli Wigman and youth. The majority of landowners around the PNG LNG site in Hela Province are from the Huli ethnic group. Image by Ron Knight via Flickr CC-BY‘Utter nonsense’PNG Prime Minister Peter O’Neill has challenged Jubilee Australia’s conclusions, as have ExxonMobil and Oil Search.During a May 2 speech in Brisbane, Australia, O’Neill denounced the first of the Jubilee Australia reports as “fake news” and “utter nonsense.” He said he had not read the paper, but accused its authors of aligning themselves with his political opponents.ExxonMobil and Oil Search, meanwhile, pointed to their royalty payment agreements as well as their corporate social responsibility initiatives, and noted it was the government, and not them, who was responsible for relaying payments to landowners.“PNG LNG royalty payments due to the government began, and have continued, since the start of production operations in 2014. Payment and distribution of royalties and other benefits due to landowners in the Project is the responsibility of the PNG government and is based upon benefits sharing agreements previously executed between the government and Project area landowners,” ExxonMobil said in a statement to the Business and Human Rights Resource Centre. The company also pointed to its social investment program and its support for humanitarian relief in the aftermath of an earthquake that struck the project area in February.Oil Search said royalty payments were distributed to the PNG LNG plant site and to traditional landholders in 2017, although it added that “significant payments” were still outstanding. “[W]hat is good for Oil Search is good for PNG. We have a strategic interest in ensuring that we maintain a stable operating environment based on strong and enduring relationships with local communities,” the company said.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Isabel Estermancenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more


‘We see its value’: Ugandan communities benefiting from agroforestry

Posted On Feb 10 2020 by

first_imgFarming communities in the western Ugandan highlands of Butanda have for generations practiced agroforestry, intercropping fruit, grains and vegetables with medicinal plants, trees and grasses on their land.The practice allows them to harvest food throughout the year, both for sustenance and to sell, provides them with timber and other resources, and prevents soil erosion while boosting water conservation.A local NGO is working to promote the practice to other communities in the region, including to cattle farmers, who have often overlooked the importance of trees in providing shade and protection for their herds.Experts say there’s much to learn from the indigenous communities that have long practiced some form of agroforestry, and have stressed the importance of heeding this valuable store of knowledge. BUTANDA, Uganda — On a forested hill in the highlands of Butanda, in western Uganda, James Rwebishengye and Florence Atwine have created a diverse forest canopy of more than 200 trees and smaller plants.These include trees like dragon’s blood (Dracaena cinnabari), wild banana (Musa balbisiana) and tamarillo, or tree tomato (Solanum betaceum), along with the smaller Terlingua Creek cat’s-eye (Cryptantha crassipes) and local papaya and bamboo species.Beneath the trees grow various types of crops: vegetables like cabbages and carrots, legumes like beans and peas, and medicinal plants including chayote (Sechium edule), white horehound (Marrubium vulgare), elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum), and winter cherries (Solanum pseudocapsicum).But this piece of land holds far more significance to Rwebishengye and Atwine than merely being a supply of food for home consumption and sale. The pair inherited this forest-mimicking garden based on the tradition of agroforestry — where taller trees and palms are grown in combination with mid-level shrubs, all of which yield useful products from fruit to timber or medicine, with vegetables and medicinals on the forest floor below — from Rwebishengye’s late father, and the garden dates back several generations.Agroforestry plot in Masaka, Uganda. Image via The Future Society“I am now 60 years old,” Rwebishengye says. “Our forefathers used to practice this type of farming before and we have lived on it and maintained it up to now because we see [its] value, and most importantly, we benefit from the medicinal trees more than you can imagine.”A 2005 study in western Uganda indicated that close to 50 percent of tree cover on farms in the Kigezi Highlands, of which Butanda is a part, was composed of planted trees. This suggested that farmers were intentionally contributing to tree diversity conservation by actively planting trees. The wide-ranging canopy and the use of local plants, Rwebishengye says, makes the garden stronger: it needs less water, no artificial fertilizers or pesticides, and is more resilient to climatic change impacts.“That is why it has been easy for us to sustain it through generations, and we have been talking to our children about its importance: we intend to leave it for posterity,” he says.The Rwebishengyes aren’t the only people practicing this method in the area. Many other families do it at a slightly smaller scale, like Peter Twijukye and his wife, Patience Busingye, from Nyamiryango, a neighboring village, who have an acre of land (0.4 hectares) dedicated to agroforestry.“I have chayote, the fruit with amazing medicinal effects,” Twijukye says, listing the crops he grows: “Elephant grass, the incredible black-jack [Bidens pilosa] that heals wounds and cuts instantly, papaya, and bananas in our garden. We have maintained it for generations and it provides a steady supply of food and medicine. We also seasonally grow cabbages, beans and peas.”The main agroforestry practice in this community of indigenous Batwa and ethnic Bainika people entails the planting of trees along the upper and lower slopes of their farms, with elephant grass grown in the middle of slopes, and planting sorghum, beans, peas and sometimes wheat along the terraces.“Agroforestry can deliver a more diverse farm and inspire the whole rural economy, leading to food stability among our communities,” says Duncan Mbonigaba, the local council secretary in Nyamurindira, in Butanda parish. “With this type of farming, the economic risks are reduced because our people have multiple products [which] leads to increased production.”Jaconius Musingwire, formerly of the National Environment Management Authority’s western Uganda office, says “Agroforestry practices relate with each other through their protective and productive functions that benefit the farmers as well as the land.“They benefit the land by preventing soil erosion and landslides that would otherwise adversely affect the agricultural crops,” he says, “and benefit the farmers [by] maintaining and restoring soil fertility through nutrient cycling, soil and water conservation, modifying microclimate, providing shade, and as living fences and wind breaks.”Biodiversity benefitsThis style of farming is also friendly to wildlife, which can find a home and food among the forested acres. Small animals that frequent the Rwebishengyes’ 1.4-hectare (3.5-acre) expanse of forested land include the African golden cat (Caracal aurata), wild cats (Felis lybica), greater cane rat (Thryonomys swinderianus), and African giant pouched rat (Cricetomys gambianus).The area is also rich in birds, including the globally threatened Grauer’s swamp warbler (Bradypterus graueri), an endangered species, and the Kivu ground thrush (Geokichla piaggiae tanganicae), an uncommon subspecies of the Abyssinian ground thrush (G. piaggiae).Establishing passion fruit as a high value agroforestry crop. Image by Nature UgandaOther birds include the handsome francolin (Pternistis nobilis), red-throated alethe (Chamaetylas poliophrys), Archer’s robin-chat (Cossypha archeri), collared apalis (Oreolais ruwenzorii), red-faced woodland warbler (Phylloscopus laetus), regal sunbird (Cinnyris regius) and Shelley’s crimson-wing (Cryptospiza shelleyi).Wider benefitsThis agricultural technique also allows farmers to make use of the environmental services that trees provide. “Agroforestry can help build fertile topsoil by increasing the amount of organic litter returned to soils,” says Keith Shepherd, principal soil scientist and leader of the Land Heath Decisions research unit at the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) in Nairobi, Kenya. Small livestock also have a role to play: chickens and ducks roam the Rwebishengyes’ land, swallowing winter cherries and pecking at fallen papayas, leaving behind droppings that serve to fertilize the plants.The integrated cropping system practiced by the Rwebishengyes also helps their soil stay in place while it builds up. “Integrating trees in cropping systems can also protect the topsoil horizon from soil erosion, both by providing physical protection of soil from erosive rain storms and by building better soil structure through increased organic matter and soil biological activity,” Shepherd says.He adds that more people should emulate the Rwebishengyes and practice this type of farming. “Agroforestry can improve water tables where it helps to improve water infiltration in soils and deep drainage, but the reverse can happen if trees are planted in areas where they are not suited, and then result in depletion of groundwater tables,” he says. “Slow-growing trees and deciduous trees tend to use less water than fast-growing and evergreen trees.”Spreading the wordThe NGO Nature Uganda has started an initiative in nearby Kabale and Rubanda districts to encourage communities to practice agroforestry. In Kabale, the group is looking to increase biodiversity on agricultural land and boost productivity and adaptation to climate change, as well as provide energy options for local communities.It has also introduced bamboo cultivation in three villages in Rubanda to stabilize land as a means of mitigating landslides and soil erosion, and to provide an alternative source of bamboo to ease pressure on Echuya Forest, the only bamboo forest in the region.“Trees provide a shelter that reduces wind and soil erosion,” says Achilles Byaruhanga, executive director of Nature Uganda. “And some trees act as fertilizers, reduce insect pests and disease infestation.“Trees grown along watercourses can take up and ‘brush out’ polluted farm runoff,” he adds. “They increase the diversity of species by providing habitat, including species that are [useful] to farmers like bees and butterflies which pollinate the crops. Also, some studies have shown that many species of birds benefit.”Communities profit, too, because bamboo that is grown in villages is used in making income-generating handcrafts as well as stakes for cultivating bean plants, a common crop for many farmers in the Kigezi region.People carrying bamboo harvested from wild forests for fuel. Image via Nature UgandaExperts say agroforestry is also crucial in the fight against climate change, due to the practice’s role in sequestering carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases. “Carbon pools in terrestrial systems include the aboveground plant biomass and belowground biomass such as roots, soil micro-organisms, and the relatively stable forms of organic and inorganic carbon,” says Erick Towett, a scientist at the World Agroforestry Centre. “Agroforestry systems have a higher potential to sequester carbon because of their ability for greater capture and utilization of [nutrients] than monocrops or pastures. Agroforestry has the potential for addressing many of the land-management and environmental problems.”Light and shadeAgroforestry is more than just planting trees, but can rather be seen as a form of shade and light management. “The science lies in how one manages the shade and light,” says Rebecca Kalibwani, head of the agriculture department at Bishop Stuart University in the city of Mbarara, adding that the tree cover should be at least 20 percent in order to maintain soil organic matter and other biological and biodiversity activities at suitable levels.Kalibwani says shade is important for more than just coffee and chocolate, and cites the agroforestry system known as silvopasture, where grazing livestock are kept under a canopy of trees. While some ranchers in western Uganda clear large chunks of land to set up dairy farms, Kalibwani and other experts say they could actually improve their income by leaving or at least introducing trees, since they would gain multiple benefits by selling timber and by providing shade for their cattle.Well-planned tree belts in pastures provide benefits to livestock in both rainy and dry seasons, since they provide a windbreak during the former and shade during the latter. This protection lowers animal stress and increases feeding efficiency.“Changes in seasons produce irregular feeding patterns in livestock and cause them to be more vulnerable to diseases and other health problems. Scientists believe that cattle provided with protection in the form of tree belts spend more time eating and less time stressed, which can lead to high milk yields,” says Musingwire, the former National Environment Management Authority official.There’s also an agroforestry practice called “alley cropping,” an ancient system widely used here that involves rows of valuable woody trees alternated with rows of maize, beans and other fruits and vegetables.A silvopasture system. Image courtesy World Agroforestry CentreRwebishengye says agroforestry also has its challenges. A big one is that birds that nest in the trees feed on crops like peas, and are the first to find ripening fruits. But the “early morning wake-up music” the birds provide on their forested lands has, over the years, grown from being noise to sweet music to the farmers’ ears.Some communities still clear trees for farms, not knowing that the trees provide a wealth of benefits. Kalibwani says all stakeholders should advise the public about the importance of agroforestry for climate change mitigation, adaptation, resilience and food security.“Agroforestry is an economically and ecologically viable farming practice that enhances overall productivity, soil enrichment, maintaining environmental services such as carbon sequestration, phytoremediation” — where plants clean up contaminated soil, air and water — “watershed protection and biodiversity conservation,” she says.Clement Okia, the World Agroforestry Centre’s country representative for Uganda, agrees while also citing the importance of learning from indigenous people. “Indigenous communities are knowledgeable about important trees, their uses, and community perception regarding them. Their knowledge helps experts in [identifying] priority local trees and shrubs that can be integrated in an agroforestry intervention,” he says.“Indigenous communities have lived with trees for [very] long and therefore are able to identify trees needed for various uses in the area, including those with medicinal value,” he adds.And listening to the accumulated wisdom of local people always makes sense.This article is part of Mongabay’s ongoing series on agroforestry worldwide.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. Agriculture, Agroforestry, Archive, Biodiversity, Climate Change, Community Development, Conservation, Conservation Solutions, Development, Featured, food security, Forests, Indigenous Peoples, Poverty Alleviation, Sustainable Development Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Erik Hoffnerlast_img read more


Deep-sea survey of Australian marine parks reveals striking species

Posted On Feb 10 2020 by

first_imgA monthlong survey of deep-sea seamounts in and around Australia’s Huon and Tasman Fracture marine parks has revealed a spectacular range of species, from feathery corals and tulip-shaped glass sponges to bioluminescent squids and ghost sharks.Researchers surveyed 45 seamounts and covered 200 kilometers (124 miles), collecting 60,000 stereo images and some 300 hours of video.Close to the surface, they recorded data on 42 seabird species and eight whale and dolphin species. The researchers also used a net to collect some animals from the seamounts for identification, many of which are potentially new to science. South of Tasmania, hundreds of undersea mountains mark the deep ocean floor. Now, a monthlong survey of these seamounts in and around Australia’s Huon and Tasman Fracture marine parks has revealed a spectacular range of deep-sea species, from feathery corals and tulip-shaped glass sponges to bioluminescent squids and ghost sharks. The survey team has also uncovered more than 100 previously unnamed species that are likely new to science.The seamounts within the marine parks occur at depths of 700 to 1,500 meters (2,300 to 4,900 feet). These mountains are home to cold-water corals that are slow-growing, fragile and threatened by fishing, deep-sea mining and climate change-induced variations in sea temperature and acidity. But accessing these harsh, dark, high-pressure depths is extremely hard. So scientists and park managers went aboard the Investigator, a research ship that’s part of Australia’s Marine National Facility, and used a special camera system designed by staff at the Australian government’s Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) to see what lies thousands of feet beneath the ocean’s surface.The deep-tow system, weighing about 350 kilograms (770 pounds), has four cameras secured within high-strength aluminium housings, and a fiber-optic cable that feeds real-time footage of the deep-sea floor back to the ship. During the monthlong exploration, the researchers surveyed 45 seamounts using the deep-tow cameras, voyage chief scientist Alan Williams of CSIRO said in a statement. They covered 200 kilometers (124 miles) and collected 60,000 stereo images and some 300 hours of video. The footage captured hundreds of corals, including the main reef-building stony coral (Solenosmilia variabilis) and many other soft corals.“While it will take months to fully analyse the coral distributions, we have already seen healthy deep-sea coral communities on many smaller seafloor hills and raised ridges away from the seamounts, to depths of 1450 meters [4,760 feet],” Williams said in the statement. “This means that there is more of this important coral reef in the Huon and Tasman Fracture marine parks than we previously realised.”Yellow stony coral on a seamount. Image by CSIRO.The team saw bioluminescent squids, ghost sharks, deep-water sharks, rays, orange roughy, and oreos near the seamounts. And close to the surface of the sea, they recorded data on 42 seabird species and eight whale and dolphin species. The researchers also used a net to collect some animals from the seamounts for identification. Many species, as one would expect from remote areas, were potentially new to science.“For several of the museum taxonomists onboard, this was their first contact with coral and mollusc species they had known, and even named, only from preserved specimens,” Williams and Nic Bax, director of CSIRO’s NERP Marine Biodiversity Hub, write in the Conversation.In one of the seamounts, the team saw what they say is the “world’s only known aggregation of deep-water eels.”“We have sampled these eels twice before and were keen to learn more about this rare phenomenon,” Williams and Bax write. “Using an electric big-game fishing rig we landed two egg-laden female eels from a depth of 1,100 metres [3,610 feet]: a possible first for the record books.”The areas now under the protection of the Tasman Fracture commonwealth marine reserve (created in 2007) and Huon commonwealth marine reserve (established in 1999), were once heavily fished by trawlers. Researchers say the present surveys can shed light on both what grows in the deep-sea environments, and if corals that were damaged by bottom-trawling are recovering after 20 years of protection.“While we saw no evidence that the coral communities are recovering, there were signs that some individual species of corals, featherstars and urchins have re-established a foothold,” Williams said.A brittlestar. Image by CSIRO.Coral with a brittlestar. Image by CSIRO.A rock crab collected from the deep sea. Image by Fraser Johnston/CSIRO. Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Environment, Marine, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, New Species, Oceans, Species Discovery, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Shreya Dasguptalast_img read more