Weekly unemployment claims dip again

Posted On Dec 31 2020 by

first_imgWeekly unemployment claims in Vermont decreased for the second straight week, as March results remained slightly higher than February. Last week there were 884 new regular benefit claims for Unemployment Insurance in Vermont last week. This is a decrease of 75 from the week before and are 39 more than last year’s total.Altogether 10,141 new and continuing claims were filed, a decrease of 270 from a week ago and 2,171 fewer than a year ago. The Department also processed 1,501 First Tier claims for benefits under Emergency Unemployment Compensation, 2008 (EUC08), 16 fewer than a week ago. In addition, there were 731 Second Tier claims for benefits processed under the EUC08 program, which is 23 more than the week before. The Unemployment Weekly Report can be found at: http://www.vtlmi.info/(link is external). Previously released Unemployment Weekly Reports and other UI reports can be found at: http://www.vtlmi.info/lmipub.htm#uc(link is external)  Meanwhile, US claims also continued to fall. In the week ending March 17, the advance figure for seasonally adjusted initial claims was 348,000, a decrease of 5,000 from the previous week’s revised figure of 353,000. The 4-week moving average was 355,000, a decrease of 1,250 from the previous week’s revised average of 356,250.The advance seasonally adjusted insured unemployment rate was 2.6 percent for the week ending March 10, a decrease of 0.1 percentage point from the prior week’s revised rate of 2.7 percent.The advance number for seasonally adjusted insured unemployment during the week ending March 10 was 3,352,000, a decrease of 9,000 from the preceding week’s revised level of 3,361,000. The 4-week moving average was 3,385,750, a decrease of 13,000 from the preceding week’s revised average of 3,398,750.Vermont’s unemployment rate fell two-tenths to 5.0 percent in January. See story HERE.last_img read more


HUD allocates nearly $18 million to help Vermont recover from Tropical Storm Irene

Posted On Dec 31 2020 by

first_imgIn one of the largest single grants to the state to help after Tropical Storm Irene, the US Department of Housing and Urban Development is releasing $17,932,000 in community rebuilding funds to Vermont from a disaster relief appropriations bill passed by Congress and signed by the President in January. The news was released by Senator Patrick Leahy (D), Senator Bernie Sanders (I), Congressman Peter Welch (D) and Governor Peter Shumlin (D) Wednesday.  Leahy, Sanders and Welch supported the disaster relief measure and wrote a letter to HUD advocating for the funding.Altogether, Vermont now has received more than $430 million in federal assistance to help the state rebuild after Irene. HUD is allocating the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Disaster Recovery grants to areas in nine states, totaling $514 million, with the greatest unmet needs.  The funding announced Wednesday supplements nearly $22 million HUD allocated to Vermont under the same program in January of 2012.  HUD has targeted these grants to help communities rebuild homes, businesses and infrastructure beyond those addressed by other forms of public and private assistance.  HUD soon will publish specific guidelines for using these funds, and the Vermont Agency of Commerce and Community Development will finalize disaster ‘ action plans’ describing how they intend to use the funding to support disaster recovery.  Leahy, Sanders and Welch said HUD has pledged prompt reviews of those plans.Two features of the CDBG program make these funds especially useful:  The program’ s flexibility enables the state to forge a Vermont-specific plan and allows the state to use the funds to match other federal disaster recovery programs, including FEMA’ s Hazard Mitigation Grant Program.  As an example, the state used part of January 2012 grant to make matching grants to homeowners participating in the FEMA home buyout program whose homes were destroyed by Irene.  Without those grants, the homeowners would not have been fully and fairly compensated for their homes, as FEMA only pays 75 percent of appraised value.In a joint statement, Leahy, Sanders and Welch said:  ‘ This is another major building block in Vermont’ s recovery.  These are funds for made-in-Vermont answers for specific community needs.  It was a high priority for us to work to top-up funding for this crucial program in the emergency storm relief bill in January, and we thank Secretary Donovan for his prompt turnaround in allocating these funds to Vermont and to other states where the needs are greatest.’  Governor Shumlin said:  “This announcement means more tools are on the way as Vermonters and their communities continue to rebuild from Tropical Storm Irene.  The persistence and hard work of our congressional delegation has brought us this good news from Washington and we are grateful.  As we learn more about the details of the funding, we’ll move quickly to match it to the needs we know remain.” As the most senior member of the Senate Appropriations Committee and of its HUD subcommittee, Leahy again led on the committee in ensuring that the disaster assistance funds were included in the appropriations package in January.  Leahy, Sanders and Welch then wrote to HUD officials underscoring Vermont’ s ongoing needs and asking for timely release of the funds.  ‘ In the last two years, many communities have had to deal with the reality of our changing climate and the increasing severity of natural disasters,’ said HUD Secretary ShaunDonovan.  ‘ HUD is continuing to work closely with state and local partners to help them realize a locally driven vision for restoring and rebuilding housing, infrastructure, and businesses that have been affected.’              The Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013, signed into law by President Obama on January 29th, included $16 billion in CDBG-Disaster Recovery funding.  Eight days later, HUD announced a first round of aid totaling $5.4 billion to five states and the City of New York impacted by Hurricane Sandy.  HUD will announce additional allocations throughout the year based upon the level of remaining needs to help other states and local communities impacted by natural disasters in 2011-2013.  HUD’ s CDBG-Disaster Recovery grants are intended to confront housing, business and infrastructure needs beyond those addressed by other forms of public and private assistance.  Using a combination of data from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the Small Business Administration (SBA), HUD identified those states and local communities requiring the greatest assistance to recover from devastating tornadoes in the Southeast and Missouri; remnants of Hurricanes Irene and Lee in the Northeast and New England; severe flooding in parts of North Dakota; and destructive wildfires in Texas. HUD will shortly publish a Notice that will regulate the use of the funds announced today.  State and local grantees will then finalize disaster ‘ action plans’ describing how they intend to expend these funds to support disaster recovery and HUD will quickly review them.last_img read more


S30, energy siting bill, to get limited airing in House Natural Resources

Posted On Dec 31 2020 by

first_imgby Andrew Stein March 28, 2013 vtdigger.org A stripped-down version of S30 sailed smoothly through the Senate on Thursday, and now it’ s headed to a skeptical House committee.The controversial Senate bill, which initially proposed a three-year moratorium on utility scale wind developments, was gutted on Tuesday. The previous version of the bill would have given municipalities greater leverage over the permitting process by applying criteria from Act 250, the state’ s governing land-use law.The draft that the Senate passed allocates $75,000 for a series of economic, environmental and health assessments associated with wind turbine projects that the Public Service Department would carry out. The bill would refine the structure of the Joint Energy Committee, and it would charge the committee with reviewing the studies and the findings of the energy siting commission,which was created by Gov. Peter Shumlin in response to issues raised with the current siting process.The bill also makes clear that commercial construction, including that of electric power plants, is prohibited ‘ within any state park or forest.’Rep. Tony Klein, who chairs the House Natural Resources and Energy Committee, was staunchly against the initial version of S.30. As the bill comes to his committee, he says his team will focus solely on the studies.‘ We will be focusing in on what it is that’ s going to be studied and what the tone is going to be,’ he said. ‘ My first impression of the read, and I intend to change that, is that it seems to be implying that renewables are bad, and I would rather change it to start with the premise that renewables are good.’That means Klein’ s committee will take limited testimony.‘ It’ s not going to be an open door policy because it’ s a study and there are certain things that are being asked to be studied,’ he said. ‘ I don’ t need to hear from neighbors.’While no amendments were officially proposed to the bill, two were entertained in the Senate Natural Resources and Energy Committee prior to the vote.Sen. Tim Ashe crafted one of the amendments, which would have included electric and natural gas transmission lines in the proposed studies. Ashe’ s amendment also tweaked some of the bill’ s language, but did not propose any policy changes. He said his amendment stemmed from concerns he heard from Chittenden, Addison and Rutland county residents about the siting of transmission lines.Sen. John Rodgers, D-Essex Orleans, proposed the other amendment. His amendment would have required energy generation applicants to submit project plans to municipal and regional planning commissions six months prior to a permit request with the Public Service Board ‘ rather than 45 days, as is current practice.‘ I think there were a lot of important things that got stripped out of S.30,’ he said. ‘ If we’ re not going to do anything to help those small towns have a voice in front of the Public Service Board, then at least give them a little bit more of a warning.’While Rodgers was a strong proponent of the original bill, Ashe was not.Sen. Bob Hartwell, D-Bennington, is chair of the Senate Natural Resources and Energy Committee, which approved the version of the bill with the Act 250 language. He said his committee asked the two senators to table their amendments so that S.30 could move to the House with strong support from the body.Hartwell said that while the amendments were tabled, they might find their way into other bills later this session. He also said that he does not expect language from Act 250 to come back into play this session and a moratorium on wind projects is off the table.‘ There is not going to be any moratorium language,’ he said. ‘ I’ m not sure of everything, but I think I’ m sure of that.’Gabrielle Stebbins, director of the trade organization Renewable Energy Vermont, lobbied hard against the moratorium and the Act 250 criteria. She said she would not breathe a sigh of relief until the end of the session.‘ We will certainly be keeping our eye out because that is still something certain senators are very much wanting,’ she said about the moratorium and Act 250 language. ‘ If you look at last year’ s history on the Senate floor, we did see amendments like that.’As far as the current version of S.30 goes, she said she doesn’ t have any major qualms.‘ I think it’ s meaningful the senators want to continue to have this conversation and this debate because, realistically, we need to move forward together,’ she said. ‘ And if that’ s continuing the conversation, then let’ s do it.’last_img read more


Shelburne Museum’s Spring Fest begins May 12

Posted On Dec 31 2020 by

first_imgShelburne Museum, Inc.,Celebrate spring and new exhibitions at Shelburne Museums Spring Fest, Sunday, May 12 Mothers Day. The opening day festival features indoor and outdoor activities for visitors of all ages.Garden tours, a scavenger hunt and a Mothers Day doll tea party are just a few of the happenings planned for the day. The museums 400 lilacs in 90 varieties will also be on display.  Master Gardeners will be on hand to answer questions and provide tips on gardening. Local expert Charlie Nardozzi will offer insights into heirloom vegetable gardening. The day-long celebration also marks the opening of several new special exhibitions including Larger than Life: Quilts by Velda  Newman, a vibrant and masterful display of contemporary fiber art and Trail Blazers: Horse-Powered Vehicles, which draws parallels between 19th century carriages from the collection and todays automotive culture.The family-friendly day includes:Walking Tours of the Museum Grounds. Rick Peters, director of grounds, leads tours of the museums gardens and grounds.Gallery Tour: Coverlets, Yoder Rugs and Velda Newman. Senior Curator Jean Burks on the new textile exhibitions in Hat and Fragrance Textile Gallery.Heirloom Vegetable Gardening. Local gardening expert Charlie Nardozzi talks about old-fashioned varieties that are popular today.Mothers Day Doll Tea Party. Bring a doll along for refreshments, doll hair salon, jewelry-making and games.Talk: Easy on the Gardener and Gentle on the Earth with Judith Irven. Tips on how to garden sustainably. Spring Fest is May 12 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.  Admission is $11 for Vermont residents and $5 for Vermont resident children. Admission for out-of-state residents is $22 for adults and $11 for children. For more information, visit www.shelburnemuseum.org(link is external)Below is a list of several new exhibitions that are open May 12 through October 31.Larger than Life: Quilts by Velda Newman, a vibrant and masterful display of contemporary fiber art.Trail Blazers: Horse-Powered Vehicles, exploring connections between 19th century carriages from the collection and todays automotive culture.Ogden Pleissner, Landscape Painter, highlights from the collection of Pleissners watercolor sketches and finished paintings.On June 22 the exhibition Wyeth Vertigo opens, featuring works by three generations of one of the most influential families in modern American art, N.C., Andrew and Jamie Wyeth.The Alphabet of Sheep by Patty Yoder,  rugs of the noted contemporary rug hooker from the series that celebrates her family and the beloved sheep they raised at Black House Farm in Vermont.About Shelburne Museum:  Shelburne Museum in Shelburne, Vermont is one of North Americas finest, most diverse and unconventional museums of art, design and Americana. Over 150,000 works are exhibited in a remarkable setting of 38 exhibition buildings, 25 of which are historic and were relocated to the museums beautifully landscaped 45-acre campus. Shelburnes collection includes works by the great Impressionists Claude Monet, Edouard Manet and Edgar Degas as well as a prized collection of folk art including trade signs, weathervanes and quilts. Shelburne Museum opens on May 12 and will remain open year-round with the opening of the new Center for Art and Education on August 18.SHELBURNE, Vermont (May 2, 2013)last_img read more


Northern Reliability appoints Iversen new CEO

Posted On Dec 31 2020 by

first_imgNorthern Reliability, an electric power solutions provider based in Waitsfield, has announced that Jim Iversen is assuming the role of president and CEO of the company. Iversen, formerly Chairman and CEO for M&I Strategic Partners and business consultant for Northern Reliability, brings experience and vision to his new role.Iversen has been a business leader in the industrial controls field, focusing on supply chain solutions, for over 25 years. His hallmark style includes inspiring others to see what is possible while building roadmaps for success.’This is an exciting moment for Northern Reliability as we chart our path for success with Jim Iversen at the helm. His proven leadership skills will be a huge asset to the company,’said former CEO and founder of Northern Reliability, Jeff Mack.‘I am very excited about joining the Northern Reliability team,’said Iversen. ‘I look forward to leading this company through its next phase of innovation and partnering with our clients to provide reliable back-up and remote power solutions.’Jim is joining the team at a time when the company is experiencing rapid growth as it enters new markets.‘Jim’s combined engineering and business background make him an ideal choice for the company and this next phase of growth that we are embarking on,’said co-owner and Vice President Greg Moffroid.Northern Reliability’s core slate of products, Solar Power Systems (SPS Systems), Solar Obstruction Lighting (SOLS Series), Controllers and Remote Monitoring (SC Series), Battery Energy Storage Systems (BESS Series) and Uninterruptible Power Supplies (UPS), create real energy solutions for utilities, telecommunication providers, government applications, remote and island communities and for disaster preparedness needs.About Northern Reliability, Inc.Northern Reliability (www.northernreliability.com(link is external)) is a solutions focused engineering company that designs, builds and services stand-alone electric power systems for customers needing reliable continuous power for their business or community. Our systems provide renewable energy for critical off-grid applications, reduce dependence on fossil fuels, and provide energy security and independence from conventional energy sources. Northern Reliability’Delivering Power, Anywhere. WAITSFIELD, Vt.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Northern Reliability 7.17.2013last_img read more


Ski for Heat fundraiser goes for the cold hard cash to stay warm

Posted On Dec 31 2020 by

first_imgFifteen years ago, Nordic enthusiast Martha Robertson, of Peru, Vermont, combined her passion for skiing with her passion for helping others in need to create “Ski for Heat.”  What started out as a local “ski-a-thon” in southwestern Vermont to raise $100 to help one family with heating fuel assistance has broadened its scope to aid low-income Vermonters throughout the state.Today, Ski for Heat is a series of winter events that include alpine skiing, snowboarding, cross-country skiing, and snowshoeing fundraisers at participating Vermont ski resorts and Nordic centers.  While fundraising takes place through the season, Sunday, January 25th is this year’s designated Ski for Heat day, with activities scheduled at a number of ski areas around Vermont (details can be found at www.skiforheat.org(link is external)).To date, Ski for Heat has raised more than $300,000 to benefit hundreds of Vermont families.  “The need for assistance is staggering,” commented Robertson. “Being warm is a basic need, yet many in our area either are without it, or have it at the expense of another basic living necessity, such as food or medicine. This collaborative effort—with the generous support of so many committed businesses and individuals—is striving to change that.”According to Robertson, “We want to provide assistance to as many Vermonters as we can who can barely stay warm through these cold months, and we also want to have it be fun and accessible for people of all ages and abilities to take part—folks appreciate the opportunity to make a difference for others in their communities.”Now with its own nonprofit designation from the IRS, Ski for Heat is partnering with all five of Vermont’s Community Action Agencies (CAAs) to raise money to help those in our communities who are struggling to stay warm this winter.  VSECU is the presenting sponsor of the winter-long awareness and fundraising program.”We’re a member cooperative that believes in leveraging our resources to help improve the lives of Vermonters,” said VSECU CEO Rob Miller.  “Being a part of this groundbreaking initiative aligns perfectly with our belief in helping sustain the basic needs of Vermonters, such as keeping warm.”Steve Geller, Executive Director of Southeastern Vermont Community Action and President of the Vermont Community Action Partnership, had great praise for Ski for Heat. “The VT CAAs are where Vermonters who can’t afford to heat their homes turn to when they’ve run out of heating fuel and will freeze without some quick help,” he said. “And every winter we struggle to find enough money to provide that help. Dedicated community volunteers like Martha and the many other folks who support Ski for Heat enable us to keep many more families from being left out in the cold.”There are a variety of ways for people to participate in and contribute to Ski for Heat at a level that is comfortable for them. Information and details can be found on Ski for Heat’s website, www.skiforheat.org(link is external).Community volunteers and corporate sponsors are the backbone of Ski for Heat. In addition to VSECU, sponsors include Clark’s Quality Foods in Londonderry, The Vermont Country Store, Ski Vermont, Great Big Graphics and The Point FM. Many local businesses, listed on the Ski for Heat’s website, are also contributing to this endeavor.Source: www.skiforheat.org(link is external). 1.20.2015last_img read more


CVSWMD gets USDA grant for recycling outreach

Posted On Dec 31 2020 by

first_imgVermont Business Magazine The Central Vermont Solid Waste Management District (CVSWMD) will increase outreach into the nine most rural communities among its 18 member municipalities thanks to an $89,000 grant recently awarded by the United States Department of Agriculture Rural Development program. The grant will fund a series of presentations, workshops and webinars that will help businesses and residents learn to recycle, compost, and understand Vermont’s Universal Recycling Law. “The US Department of Agriculture is committed to supporting rural infrastructure providers as they develop more sophisticated methods to serve rural communities and conserve our rural environment,” said Ted Brady, USDA Rural Development State Director. “USDA Rural Development is excited to partner with the Central Vermont Solid Waste Management District as they work to help their communities utilize Act 148 compliance to improve local environmental sustainability.”“The CVSWMD is pleased to receive this grant from the United States Department of Agriculture. The programming funded by this grant will enable the CVSWMD to increase valuable educational services and aid the District in providing information concerning the importance of recycling, composting, and other methods of sustainable materials management to member towns,” said Leesa Stewart, CVSWMD General Manager. “This programming will provide district residents and businesses with the knowledge needed to comply with the State of Vermont’s Composting and Recycling Initiative, Act 148.”Thanks to the grant, CVSWMD outreach efforts will increase in the towns of Bradford, Chelsea, Fairlee, Hardwick, Orange, Plainfield, Tunbridge, Walden and Woodbury between October 2015 and September 2016. Grant funding will also enable the District to create posters, handouts, and videos to distribute on social media and the CVSWMD  website, cvswmd.org. Videos, booklets and handouts created with grant funds will be available as downloads to empower any Vermont resident or organization to learn the ins and outs of recycling and composting.CVSWMD Zero Waste Outreach Coordinator and Grant Manager, Cassandra Hemenway, said “I will be offering workshops, talks and trainings about how to recycle, what to know about the Vermont Recycling and Composting Initiative, how landlords can meet the law’s mandates, how to get started composting, and much, much more.” Hemenway added “I’m looking forward to spending more time in some of our most rural towns and working with residents and businesses to increase recycling in the district.”Businesses or community groups interested in hosting a presentation are invited to call Hemenway at 802-229-9383 or 800-730-9475 at ext 102, or email [email protected](link sends e-mail).USDA, through its Rural Development mission area, administers and manages housing, business and community infrastructure programs through a national network of state and local offices. Rural Development has an active portfolio of more than $212 billion in loans and loan guarantees. These programs are designed to improve the economic stability of rural communities, businesses, residents, farmers and ranchers and improve the quality of life in rural areas. For more information on Rural Development visit the Vermont/New Hampshire Rural Development website rurdev.usda.gov/nh-vtHome, or contact USDA RD at (802) 828-6000.About CVSWMD:CVSWMD offers an array of programing that supports its Zero Waste implementation plan. Programs include a robust School Zero Waste Program, a Business Composting Program, the Additional Recyclables Collection Center, technical support and at-cost equipment for back yard composting, and reuse grants. For more information, go to cvswmd.org.CVSWMD member municipalities include: Barre City, Barre Town, Berlin, Bradford, Calais, Chelsea, East Montpelier, Fairlee Hardwick, Middlesex, Montpelier, Orange, Plainfield, Tunbridge, Walden, Washington, Williamstown, and Woodbury.last_img read more


Montpelier’s Susan Koch named 2016 Vermont Teacher of the Year

Posted On Dec 31 2020 by

first_imgVermont Business Magazine Susan Koch, a Union Elementary School Kindergarten and First Grade teacher in Montpelier, has been selected as the 2016 Vermont Teacher of the Year (VT-TOY), the Agency of Education announced today. In addition to teaching first grade, she has encouraged and developed the Educating Children Outdoors (ECO) Program in Montpelier. This outdoor education program has now spread to all of the grades at Union Elementary. All students are given the opportunity to learn in a natural setting throughout the entire school year.Also recognized are:·         Alternate Anne Marie Mahar, a science and biology teacher for grades 11-12 at Rutland High School; and·         Finalist Stephen Rand, an English teacher at Harwood Union Middle and High School for grades 9-12.Koch, Mahar and Rand will be honored by the State Board of Education at an event November 17. Rebecca Haslam of Champlain Elementary School is the current 2015 Vermont Teacher of the Year. Koch’s tenure as 2016 Vermont Teacher of the Year will begin January 1.As the 2016 Teacher of the Year, Koch will travel statewide visiting schools and working with teachers. In addition, she is Vermont’s candidate for the National Teacher of the Year award, sponsored by the Council of Chief State School Officers. Koch will travel to Washington, DC, this spring for a reception at the White House, where she will meet the president.Susan Koch“I am proud to represent all of the incredible teachers and colleagues I have met, studied with, collaborated with, and admired.” said Koch. “Education today is a vibrant exciting profession. The role of a teacher in a child’s education has fundamentally changed. We are no longer lecturing student’s as they sit in a “one size fits all classroom”. Educators are providing unique learning opportunities for students that often include forest lessons, community visits, virtual field trips, and collaborative teaching. Students are creating their own knowledge, learning actively, setting goals, and reflecting upon their learning. The teaching profession is a dynamic and exciting field.”Since 1964, Vermont has participated in this program recognizing outstanding teachers. For more information about the Vermont Teacher of the Year program, go to: http://education.vermont.gov/department/awards/teacher-of-the-year(link is external).last_img read more


Senator McAllister suspended

Posted On Dec 31 2020 by

first_imgVermont Business Magazine The Vermont Senate this afternoon voted 20-10 to suspend Senator Norman H McAllister (R-Franklin). McAllister has denied the felony sexual assualt charges against him. The suspension would terminate if he is found not guilty or the charges are dismissed. A trial could start as early as February but will likely not start before March. This is believed to be the first time the Legislature has taken such action. Franklin County and the Senate as a whole will be down one senator. The vote was not partisan. According to vtdigger.org, McAllister himself voted against the suspension. According to the Burlington Free Press, he immediately left the Chamber.Lieutenant Governor Phil Scott, a Republican running for governor this year, issued the following statement about the Vermont Senate’s vote Wednesday to suspend McAllister:“Today the Vermont Senate, for the first time in history, suspended one of its own members – Senator Norman McAllister of Franklin County. It is unfortunate the Senate was forced to take such action in this unprecedented situation, as it is my belief Senator McAllister should have resigned before now. Senator McAllister is charged with serious criminal offenses, and from my standpoint, if it were a law enforcement officer or teacher accused of crimes of this magnitude they would be placed on administrative leave. This action allowed the Senate to govern its own member without getting involved in the criminal case, which could have been seen as influencing the case itself. It is now my hope the Vermont Senate can return to the issues at hand and work towards making Vermont a more prosperous state for families and businesses by concentrating on the fiscal fundamentals and growth of the economy.”Scott, who votes in the Senate only in case of a tie, had previously urged McAllister to resign.VtDigger: SENATE VOTES TO SUSPEND MCALLISTER(link is external)last_img read more


Vermont party to $225 million national new car/parts settlement

Posted On Dec 31 2020 by

first_imgConsumers and businesses may be included in the Class if, from 1998 to 2015, they:Bought or leased a new motor vehicle in the U.S. (not for resale), orIndirectly paid for a motor vehicle replacement part (not for resale).  (Indirectly means they bought the replacement part from someone other than the manufacturer of the part.)New motor vehicles include, but are not limited to, automobiles, cars, light trucks, pickup trucks, crossovers, vans, mini-vans, and sport utility vehicles.  Visit the website, www.AutoPartsClass.com(link is external), or call 1-877-940-5043 for a full list of Settling Defendants and applicable time periods.The Settlements provide money for consumers in the District of Columbia and 30 states – Arizona, Arkansas,California, Florida, Hawaii, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri,Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oregon,Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, Vermont, West Virginia, and Wisconsin.  The Settlements also provide non-monetary relief, including cooperation, and an agreement by certain Settling Defendants not to engage in certain conduct for a period of 24 months. The litigation is continuing against the remaining Non-Settling Defendants.  All funds received in this case will be distributed at the conclusion of the lawsuits or as ordered by the Court.  Notice about the claims process will be provided at a later date, and consumers and businesses should register to receive notice about the claims process or future settlements at www.AutoPartsClass.com(link is external).Important Information and Dates:Eligible consumers or businesses that want to sue the Settling Defendants regarding a particular component part must exclude themselves from that Settlement Class by April 11, 2016.Eligible consumers or businesses can object to one or more of the Settlements by April 11, 2016. The Court will hold a hearing on May 11, 2016, to consider whether to approve the Settlements and approve Class Counsel’s request that up to $11.25 million be set aside for future litigation costs and expenses.  Class Counsel will also request at the hearing, or at a later date, attorneys’ fees of up to one-third of the Settlements’ funds, incentive awards, plus reimbursement of costs and expenses.For more detailed information about the Settlements and a full list of Settling Defendants and time periods:Visit: www.AutoPartsClass.com(link is external)Call: 1-877-940-5043Write to: Auto Parts Settlements, P.O. Box 10163, Dublin, OH 43017-3163SOURCE WASHINGTON, Feb. 16, 2016 /PRNewswire/ — Kinsella Media, LLC Vermont Business Magazine The following is being released by the Notice Provider, Kinsella Media, LLC, about the lawsuit In re Automotive Parts Antitrust Litigation, MDL No. 2311. There is an update for affected purchasers in this lawsuit about certain motor vehicle components, as there have been additional Settlements that may affect their rights. Settlements totaling approximately $225 million have now been reached with eleven Defendants.  The lawsuits allege that they fixed the price of certain motor vehicle components, causing millions of consumers and businesses from around the country to overpay for new or leased automobiles and replacement parts, such as air flow meters, alternators, ATF warmers, automotive wire harness systems, electronic throttle bodies, fuel injection systems, fuel senders, heater control panels, high intensity discharge ballasts, ignition coils, instrument panel clusters, inverters, motor generators, occupant safety restraint systems, radiators, starters, steering angle sensors, switches, and valve timing control devices.last_img read more